Categories
Technology for Teaching

Crowdsourcing

Crowdsourcing can be defined as; “the practice of obtaining needed ideas or content by soliciting contributions from a large group of people, particularly using online methods”. (Definition appears in Crowdsourcing in medical education: a visual example using anatomical henna by Christopher See published in the FASEB Journal.)

Facebook

Facebook is a social media site with the mission “to give people the power to share and make the world more open and connected. People use Facebook to stay connected with friends and family, to discover what’s going on in the world, and to share and express what matters to them.” (Quote from Facebook’s Facebook page.)

Device Agnostic

Ideascale

IdeaScale is a platform to share ideas, vote, and discuss feedback.

Device Agnostic

Piazza

Piazza is a free platform for instructors and TAs to efficiently manage out-of-class Q&A. On their class dashboard, students can post questions and collaborate Wikipedia-style to edit responses to these questions. Instructors can also answer questions, endorse student answers, and edit or delete any posted content. (From Piazza’s website)

Device Agnostic

Twitter*

Twitter allows users to post questions, responses to questions, share resources, opinions, news and personal updates via various devices (cell phones, laptops) in 140 characters or less. These posts are called Tweets and usually reference a particular topic using a hashtag. (Example: #telehealth)

Twitter lets users create connections and develop networks of contacts and resources as well.

Device Agnostic

References

The following are a list of references about the use of crowdsourcing in teaching and learning.


*Tools that appear with an asterisk are commonly used at the Geisel School of Medicine.

Categories
Technology for Teaching

Collaborative Authoring

Collaborative authoring allows multiple individuals to seamlessly contribute to the same document either synchronously or asynchronously. Collaborative authoring tools can be used throughout the entire writing process: planning, drafting, revision, and final product delivery.

Google Docs

With Google Docs, multiple people can work in the same document at the same time without the need to save the document. Docs, Spreadsheets, and Slides provide features similar to Microsoft Office or the Apple Productivity Suite all within the cloud.

Access to Google Docs for course use are available through the Collaborations menu in Canvas. To use the tool from Canvas, users will need to have Google accounts.

Device Agnostic

Office 365*

With Office 365, multiple people can work in the same document at the same time without the need to save the document. This feature works well with Word and Excel. All users currently need to have a Dartmouth NetID in order to edit the documents.

This feature is now available in the Collaborations tool in Canvas for the course and for Small Groups. Contact Geisel Instructional Technology to have it set up within your course.

SyncSpace

SyncSpace provides a zoomable drawing space that can be sketched on by multiple collaborators, at any time. SyncSpace is an iPad app. The collaboration space can be used with individuals in the same room or individuals at a distance.

Editable on iOS and Android. Viewable on all devices.

References

The following are a list of references about the use of social bookmarking in teaching and learning.


*Tools that appear with an asterisk are commonly used at the Geisel School of Medicine

Categories
Technology for Teaching

Brainstorming

Brainstorming is a process whereby students generate a free-form list of issues or ideas, typically in response to a specific question, case, or topic.  Brainstorming activates prior knowledge and helps students construct a framework and structure for the task they’ve been given. Initially, the issues and ideas are presented without judgement, critique, or indepth discussion. Only after the issues and ideas have been generated and recorded are they analyzed to identify the best solution or develop a plan of action.

Answer Garden

AnswerGarden is a minimalistic feedback tool. Use it in the classroom as an educational tool or at work as a creative brainstorming tool. (Per AnswerGarden website)

AnswerGarden is free. Simply pose a question in AnswerGarden and have the class post 20 to 40 character responses. User responses display as a word/tag cloud.

Device Agnostic

Jot

Jot! is a simple, fast whiteboard that lets you sketch out your ideas and share them in real time.

Lino

Lino provides users with a collaborative space to post virtual sticky notes to a canvas. The notes can include text, images, videos and urls. These notes can then be colored, rearranged, and clustered as part of the brainstorming process. Lino is a free online tool that works on both laptops and iPads.

Device Agnostic

Padlet

Padlet provides users with a collaborative space to post text, images, videos and urls to a virtual wall.  These notes can then be rearranged and clustered as part of the brainstorming process. Padlet is an online tool that works on both laptops and iPads.

Device Agnostic

SyncSpace

SyncSpace provides a zoomable drawing space that can be sketched on by multiple collaborators, at any time. SyncSpace is an iPad app. The collaboration space can be used with individuals in the same room or individuals at a distance.

Editable on iOS and Android. Viewable on all devices.

References

The following are just a few resources addressing the use of brainstorming in teaching and learning.

Categories
Technology for Teaching

Social Bookmarking

Social bookmarking is the practice of saving bookmarks to a website accessible by others and “tagging” them with keywords. Social bookmarking is particularly useful when collecting a set of resources that are to be shared with others such as PBL groups, project groups, etc.

Diigo*

Diigo is a social bookmarking tool allowing the users individually or collaboratively gather, tag, organize and share resources, research, websites, images and more. Diigo Groups allow for team-based research to be shared privately (among the group) or publicly (with the world).

Zotero

Zotero allows users to collect research in a single, searchable interface. Zotero also allows users to create and join research groups. Each group can share its own research library, complete with files, bibliographic data, notes, and discussion threads.

References

The following are a list of references about the use of social bookmarking in teaching and learning.


*Tools that appear with an asterisk are commonly used at the Geisel School of Medicine

Categories
Technology for Teaching

Backchanneling

A backchannel is “…a line of communication created by people in an audience to connect with others inside or outside the room, with or without the knowledge of the speaker at the front of the room. Usually facilitated by Internet technologies, it is spontaneous, self-directed, and limited in time to the duration of a live event.” (Cliff Atkinson in The Backchannel)

Canvas Chat*

The Chat tool in Canvas allows students and teachers to interact in real time. Chat makes it easy to communicate with your students in real time, all in one place.

While the Canvas Chat tool does not allow for the creation of rooms, the chats are associated with a date.

Device Agnostic

Today’s Meet

TodaysMeet helps harness the backchannel and turn it into a platform that can enable new activities and discussions, extend conversations beyond the classroom, and give all students a voice.” (TodaysMeet website).

Device Agnostic

Twitter *

Twitter allows users to post questions, responses to questions, share resources, opinions, news and personal updates via various devices (cell phones, laptops) in 140 characters or less. These posts are called Tweets and usually reference a particular topic using a hashtag. (Example: #telehealth)

Twitter lets users create connections and develop networks of contacts and resources as well.

Device Agnostic

Facebook

Facebook is a social media site with the mission “to give people the power to share and make the world more open and connected. People use Facebook to stay connected with friends and family, to discover what’s going on in the world, and to share and express what matters to them.” (Quote from Facebook’s Facebook page.)

Device Agnostic

References

The following are a list of references about the use of backchannels in teaching and learning.


*Tools that appear with an asterisk are commonly used at the Geisel School of Medicine.

Categories
Technology for Teaching

Audio

The use of audio in education has traditionally been used to reproduce traditional methods of teaching, such as a podcast. However, audio can be used not only to convey “knowledge”, but also to provide feedback, record “stories”, evaluate communications among others.

Be aware that  audio may not accessible by individuals with hearing impairments and thus should ideally be accompanied by a transcript.

Canvas Media Tool*

Canvas, Geisel’s Learning Management System, affords all users with the opportunity to record audio using the media comment tool available from within the Rich Text Editor. This tool can be used to add audio to course pages, discussions, assignment feedback and even quizzes.

Camtasia Relay*

Camtasia Relay is an easy to use screen capture tool available to Geisel faculty. This tool allows users to capture a screen recording as well as the audio for that recording. This recording can be trimmed at the beginning and end before uploading it to Dartmouth owned servers. The audo and the video can be provided to the users as separate files.

Voice Recorder Pro

Voice Record Pro is a an iPad app that allows users to record voice memos of unlimited length. These voice memos can be saved as .mp3 files and shared through a variety of mechanisms.

Audacity*

Audacity is a free, easy-to-use, multi-track audio editor and recorder that works on both the Windows and Mac operating systems.

Audacity files can be exported as MP3 files with the optional LAME encoder library.

References

The following are a list of references about the use of audio in teaching and learning.


*Commonly used tool at the Geisel School of Medicine